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Author Topic: What are you reading? (apart from this)  (Read 83749 times)
Ed
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« Reply #90 on: January 10, 2008, 05:04:38 PM »

No, me neither. But then I suppose Steven King is a well fed, rich old fart these days. He was once a teacher of English Lit, too, so I suppose he must have a nose for lit over genre. I was really hoping that his choices would be thinly veiled genre stories. That's quite obviously not the case, sadly undecided
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Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
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« Reply #91 on: January 10, 2008, 05:12:58 PM »

I thought the same as you. I think I've read four so far and on all of them I thought 'So?'

I'm sure a more literary person would tell me I'm missing the all important subtext ( rolleyes) but I'm usually quite good at getting the meaning out of stories.
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aexombie
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« Reply #92 on: January 15, 2008, 07:32:09 AM »

'key of knowledge' by nora roberts. just had to borrow it after reading 'key of light' (sigh) it's like brainlessly eating M&Ms in the middle of the night...want some?
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Ed
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« Reply #93 on: February 22, 2008, 03:48:33 AM »

I'm currently reading The Keep by F Paul Wilson, and I'm enjoying it more than any book I've read lately. Probably because it combines horror with events in WW2. In my teens I read all the Sven Hassel books I could lay my hands on, so this is reminding me of that, a bit, I suppose.
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Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
Ed
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« Reply #94 on: May 23, 2008, 04:56:38 PM »

Just finished reading The Rising by Brian Keene. I'd like to ask him if it took a long time to write, because the second half of the novel is noticably better written than the first half. This was part of the reason for me throwing away a couple of novels I was writing, even as much as twenty-five to thirty thousand words into it, because I felt like my writing technique was changing and improving as I wrote it. I finally decided to write short stories until I felt my writing had stabalised.

*spoiler* (ish)
BTW, the ending of The Rising really pissed me off - it was all coming together nicely - the pacing was good, the writing was good, the MC finally makes it to his son's house (this is the plot engine of the story - the MC's need to find his son before the zombies do) and the end is left hanging. You never find out whether Jim manages to save his son. Most unsatisfactory.

Next, I'm taking a break from horror novels and I'm going to read a couple of the best new horror volumes of short stories, edited by Steve Jones. After that, who knows...
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Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
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« Reply #95 on: May 23, 2008, 05:16:35 PM »

In my usual way of things, I'm reading a bizarre mix - George Orwell's 1984 (stuff horror, this is bloody petrifying), working my way through the Asterix the Gaul books and reading back issues of 2000AD (UK comic) from 1985! They smell of nostalgia...
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« Reply #96 on: May 23, 2008, 08:55:13 PM »

Haha, Ed, you know there's a sequel, right? I'm a big fan of Brian Keene's work. The Rising was the first novel I ever read by him, and I was hooked from that point on. Too bad you didn't like it; you might try Terminal out. It's my personal favorite!
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Ed
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« Reply #97 on: May 24, 2008, 12:19:27 AM »

Yeah, I know there's a sequel - I get the impresssion there's quite a few of them built on the rising. I bought Dead Sea at the same time as I bought The Rising, so I might get around to reading that one day, but I doubt I'll bother with any more from the series because I've had enough of maggot dripping zombies for a while, plus there is still a whole bunch of other stuff I'd like to read.

Might try a bit or Orwell myself - 1984 is one of the classics of modern literature, and all I know about it is what I've gleaned from watching the film. Is it much different, Paul? I know from reading both Frankenstein and Dracula that fims can be less than faithful to the book.
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Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
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« Reply #98 on: May 24, 2008, 05:13:40 AM »

Caldo Largo by Earl Thompson, for me. He's one of the forgotten men of literature. Only wrote 4 novels before he died (and none after), but they're all great, if a little rough around the edges and explicit in the centre here and there.

Derek
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« Reply #99 on: May 24, 2008, 04:46:37 PM »

1984 is one of my absolute favourites and I've read it most years since I was about fourteen, but his other stuff is also worth having a look at if you've never indulged. One of his I found recently was The Road to Wigan Pier. It's not fiction at all - just an account of his own journey through some of the poor coal mining areas northern England. There's some great social commentary stuff!
 
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« Reply #100 on: May 24, 2008, 06:12:43 PM »

The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters are worth a look, too.

(EDITED TO ADD: Although I am currently being much less high-brow, as I am thoroughly enjoying my mate Toby Frost's Space Captain Smith - as previously advertised in this very forum. Every bit as good as I was expecting.)
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PaulH
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« Reply #101 on: May 24, 2008, 08:25:34 PM »

I'd love to tell you Ed, but I've never seen a movie of 1984! I'd guess that there's a lot more explanation of Newspeak and the reasoning of the language and how it links into the political system than a movie would want to use. Actually, as a writer, the idea that they would rewrite the entire language to deny freedom of expression and even thought is bloody petrifying!!!
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« Reply #102 on: May 24, 2008, 08:33:25 PM »

Have you seen the commercial? Well, I think they only aired it in 1984, but someone's re-done it so it's Hilary's face on the screen -- I think you can catch both on youtube.

Personally, in terms of "grabbing me by the gut," I think Fahrenheit 451 was better. In terms of cerebral reaction (as opposed to a visceral one), I thought Brave New World was better. In terms of movies, "Brazil" tops them all!

~bint
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Ed
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« Reply #103 on: May 25, 2008, 05:24:34 AM »

Thanks for the further reading tips, all. Personally, I find that kind of concept far more terrifying than any supernatural horrors, because it's infinitely possible and even with these warnings it seems to be coming to pass.

Paul - can't believe you've never seen the film. It's one of my all time favourites. That scene from the advert with the hammer thrower gives me chills. It's a bit like the image of the Chinese guy standing in front of the tank in T Square, standing his ground and stepping into its path whenever the driver changed direction. Once seen, never forgotten. Course, they dragged the poor sod into a sidestreet and shot him in the face straight afterwards, but as far as acts of defiance go he's still #1 on my list.
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Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
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« Reply #104 on: May 27, 2008, 07:07:40 PM »

I really don't watch a lot of flims or TV at all. TV is currently 3 hours a week (Heroes, NCIS, Doctor Who) and I have to be in the mood for a movie. I'd rather be in front of this screen doing something interactive.

Is the movie of 1984 the one with John Hurt?
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