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Author Topic: The good morning, good night thread  (Read 589122 times)
Geoff_N
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« Reply #585 on: September 18, 2008, 04:36:47 AM »

A can tell Geoff's back from the Isle of Man because there's somebody beating me at Scrabble again. Neil

Not true. Neil Furoored my Frump on a triple. What can I do? It's always a pleasure to lose to a manic genius Wink

Geoff
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Ed
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« Reply #586 on: September 19, 2008, 04:12:23 PM »

I've got an apple in my hand. I've had my eye on it for a long time - it was the biggest, reddest apple on the tree. I watched it grow and ripen over the past few months until the point where I thought it was nearly ready to pick. Another two weeks, I judged, and it would be perfect. Then I came home from work last week, strolled up through my garden to the apple tree, and noticed my apple was missing. I looked around on the ground for it, thinking perhaps I had been wrong and it was already ripe, but it wasn't there. Turns out my youngest son, aged 8 (I sometimes think it will be his uncommonly good fortune to make the age of 9), had picked it. Apparently he'd had his eye on it, too.

It sat on the kitchen windowsill ripening for a week before my mother came, and my wife gifted her with a carrier bag full of eating apples, whereupon I noticed my apple once again missing. Luckily, I managed to intercept the bag before it left the premises and I retrieved my apple. It's been another week now, and as far as I know it hasn't met with any further trials or mishaps. I've washed it, though it's had nothing unnatural, save for my youngest son's grubby mits, in contact with it, and it's still thick with a natural wax, so once buffed you can literally see your face in it.

I had cauliflower cheese and grilled bacon for tea, and I was feeling pretty full afterwards, but decided tonight is the night I'm going to eat my apple. I keep sniffing it, and it smells sweet and delicious. I think I'll give it another ten minutes and then tuck in.

It might seem like I'm making too big a deal out of this, but over the past week or two I've heard sad news about several people I know who have met with terrible misfortune, some have unexpectedly dropped dead, one has lost his mind to a particularly aggressive strain of Alzheimer's, another has learned of his imminent demise, and yet another had a very close scrape. And the thing is, I think it's important to stop and smell the flowers, the coffee, or the apple once in a while and just savour the moment.

You know? huh
« Last Edit: September 19, 2008, 04:20:29 PM by Ed » Logged

Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
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« Reply #587 on: September 19, 2008, 04:24:22 PM »

That is so true. How many of us grow a garden, work our muscles to the point of blistering pain planting trees and bushes, then forget to actually stop and LOOK at what we've done and enjoy it. I should send all the butterflys in my yard a muffin basket for reminding me that there are actually flowers in the yard  rolleyes
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« Reply #588 on: September 19, 2008, 07:19:31 PM »

I'm with you on that one, Ed.

Last night we went out to celebrate my partner's daughter's seventeenth. A lovely evening, but my partner's dad took a bit of turn. I was sat opposite him and it was real scary. I thought for a few moments we'd lost him. Luckily there were two recussitation nurses dining on the table next to us and they stepped in and the ambulance turned up in under two minutes. Brilliant work all round by the health professionals (in the midst of all this turmoil about massively paid bankers losing their jobs these are the real stars of the show). But it certainly brings it home to you how fragile our hold on this life and this world is.

Alos, this week, for the first time this year, I did my hours at work, well, maybe one or two over, but as close as dammit. Normally I'm so far over it ain't funny. And boy does it feel weird. It feels like I've hardly been in. I feel guilty for working so little.

Two things there that highlight a total need to change priorities. It's still easier said than done, but recognising the issues is step one!

Oh, I had a Mars bar instead of an apple, but it was nice, too!

Derek
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« Reply #589 on: September 20, 2008, 12:28:54 PM »

We finally got power back Thursday afternoon. Had a bit of a scare when it went out again an hour later! Don't know what went wrong there, but it was back on in another hour, and has been continuous ever since. You talk about the small pleasures... amazing how much we take for granted. Just being able to have the lights on after dark is a big thrill for me these past couple of days.  Cheesy All told, we were without electricity in the house for 98 hours, and we weren't even the last customers in this region to have power restored. There were still tens of thousands of families waiting for crews to remove trees and to repair lines when we were returned to The Grid. And we're a thousand miles from Houston where the major hurricane damage was done and a little over a million people are still without power.
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Ed
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« Reply #590 on: September 21, 2008, 06:37:08 AM »

That is so true. How many of us grow a garden, work our muscles to the point of blistering pain planting trees and bushes, then forget to actually stop and LOOK at what we've done and enjoy it. I should send all the butterflys in my yard a muffin basket for reminding me that there are actually flowers in the yard  rolleyes

I suddenly got the bug for it back in March, when I saw a box full of bulbs on special offer - over 100 bulbs for a tenner. Then I went into another shop where they had loads of clearance stock from somewhere, with fruit canes and vegetable seeds, etc. So I bought some of that, too. We've got a raised border around our patio, so I brought the level up and planted a load of stuff in there - lilies, ananomes, gladiolas, begonias, fuscias, petunias, ranunculas, dahlias, even some onions and rhubarb, too. Some didn't make it, but the majority did, and because it's all in a seating area we get to sit and enjoy it more than if it was all in a border somewhere. I've never paid much attention to flowers and stuff before, but I've noticed they have a positive effect on my mood. It's a bit like having an ever changing canvas outside to look at.

I'm with you on that one, Ed.

Last night we went out to celebrate my partner's daughter's seventeenth. A lovely evening, but my partner's dad took a bit of turn. I was sat opposite him and it was real scary. I thought for a few moments we'd lost him. Luckily there were two recussitation nurses dining on the table next to us and they stepped in and the ambulance turned up in under two minutes. Brilliant work all round by the health professionals (in the midst of all this turmoil about massively paid bankers losing their jobs these are the real stars of the show). But it certainly brings it home to you how fragile our hold on this life and this world is.

Also, this week, for the first time this year, I did my hours at work, well, maybe one or two over, but as close as dammit. Normally I'm so far over it ain't funny. And boy does it feel weird. It feels like I've hardly been in. I feel guilty for working so little.

Two things there that highlight a total need to change priorities. It's still easier said than done, but recognising the issues is step one!

Oh, I had a Mars bar instead of an apple, but it was nice, too!

Derek

Good for you, Del - I've worked a few twelve hour days lately, for private customers, but I've been enjoying the change of scene, so it's not so bad. On the main contract I'm running, the guy who I'm sub contracting from gave me a £30 a day pay rise because he was so happy with what I've been doing. I'm still only working an eight hour day for them, though. Just goes to show that different employers value you in different ways. The old firm that I worked for would never do anything like that.

I hope your prospective father-in-law is feeling better now. Sounds like quite a scare.

We finally got power back Thursday afternoon. Had a bit of a scare when it went out again an hour later! Don't know what went wrong there, but it was back on in another hour, and has been continuous ever since. You talk about the small pleasures... amazing how much we take for granted. Just being able to have the lights on after dark is a big thrill for me these past couple of days.  Cheesy All told, we were without electricity in the house for 98 hours, and we weren't even the last customers in this region to have power restored. There were still tens of thousands of families waiting for crews to remove trees and to repair lines when we were returned to The Grid. And we're a thousand miles from Houston where the major hurricane damage was done and a little over a million people are still without power.

Wow - that was one hell of an outage, wasn't it. TBH, I quite enjoy making do for a while. Anything out of the ordinary, in fact. I even enjoyed the one occasion when we were snowed-in and the whole country seemed to grind to a halt. It's a times like that the blitz spirit rises again and people start helping each other, sharing and making do, which is what life should be like all the time, but for some reason we don't.

Welcome back to the 21st century afro
« Last Edit: September 21, 2008, 06:37:40 AM by Ed » Logged

Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
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« Reply #591 on: September 24, 2008, 05:06:16 AM »

Had my first go at pottery last night - great fun. It was a lot different to what I'd expected, too. I thought the clay would be sloppy and would flop around all over the place as I tried to throw a pot, but it's actually quite stiff and resilient. By the end of the night I had made a finger bowl by manipulating a ball of clay in the palm of my hand, and I had thrown three one and a half pound cylinder pots on the wheel. Next week I'm supposed to be putting handles on them.

My wife's spitting feathers, because it took her months to be able to centre the clay on the wheel and actually make something worth keeping. She's a bit cack-handed, though, I think, and she doesn't generally have an eye for detail. Most of the time it seems to me like it's the small stuff that make the difference between success and failure with these types of thing. scratch
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Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
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« Reply #592 on: September 24, 2008, 08:32:43 AM »

I've just started a GCSE maths course. I'm doing it for fun, and loving it. Everyone else is doing it because they desperately need a C grade to get anywhere workwise, but would really rather be somewhere else. Anywhere else. Makes for an interesting class.
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Geoff_N
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« Reply #593 on: September 25, 2008, 07:54:03 AM »

I have a maths degree, DA. just shout if you need a hand. Bear in mind my degree was in 1973 when half the studies were on the philosphy of number, group theory and linear programming that had nowt to do with computers!

My legs are stiff after a 60 miles mountainous bike ride in North Wales yesterday. I cycled to Llangollen the hard way to find a copy of The Book Thief by Zusak in the marvelous we-have-every-book shop there. They didn't. I also needed the training. The sun broke through as I wobbled over Horseshoe Pass, so I stopped for a snack and a sunbathe - really!

Geoff
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« Reply #594 on: September 25, 2008, 01:51:53 PM »

I did my Maths degree in 74-77, so I'm slightly more current  grin

I'd be interested to hear what you think of The Book Thief, Geoff. My opinion shifted several times during the reading of it.
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Ed
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« Reply #595 on: September 27, 2008, 02:43:11 PM »

Quiet day on the boards, huh? Funny how some days are just like that - nobody's got anything to say, or maybe they're too busy to go on their computer that day.

I've been trying to finish off my shed today - trying to get it done before the rain sets in again. The weather forcasters say the wet weather will be back with us on Tuesday, and no doubt that'll be the end of the sunshine for 2008 (I hope I'm wrong about that). I've just got the corner beads left to do, along with the fascia boards and soffits, and half of it left to paint with creosote. I'll probably end up putting some guttering on it yet, too. There's a load of other stuff I want to do as well, but I've got to get my priorities straight.

The reason for the humongous shed is to have somewhere to put all the stuff from a couple of the rooms in the house, so that I can get on and gut them. I'm going to take down the ceilings and the lath and plaster from the walls, rewire them, insulate and then clack fresh plasterboard over everything, skim it, second fix carpentry, paint and decorate. Then all that leaves to be done is the extension at the back of the house, which is to include a nice big new kitchen/dinging area. Can't wait to get all that finished, then I'll finally have time for a proper damn hobby, like normal people.
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« Reply #596 on: September 27, 2008, 04:37:41 PM »

At work till 4:30--not busy small b-day party for a student. Then home to work on my costume for a Sci-Fi con next weekend. Then squeezing in some writing.  Off sunday--then back to work Monday.

DL
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« Reply #597 on: September 27, 2008, 05:12:38 PM »

Sounds hectic huh So, what's the costume -  Trekkie, Barbarella, Star Wars, Flash Gordon, The Clangers? huh
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« Reply #598 on: September 27, 2008, 06:25:17 PM »

Several of my relatives and friends are in hospital - mostly recuperating though some have non-operable conditions. So I've been bedside annoying them. Also last weekend was FantasyCon and the aftermath of reacting to review copies - both for me to do and to send books out for.  Another con is coming up, NewCon4 for scifi mid October and I'm busy preparing books etc for that. How am I going to get my bike rides in?

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« Reply #599 on: September 27, 2008, 06:37:36 PM »

I intended to visit Fantasycon, but it's such a long journey for me that I decided against it in the end. It sounds pretty small scale and low budget, too, from what people have said about past ones. What was your take on it, Geoff?
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