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Author Topic: The good morning, good night thread  (Read 588214 times)
Ed
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« Reply #945 on: April 26, 2009, 05:17:32 AM »


Which later films would you have liked to have been in the book, Caz?



  Terminator is one of the films not in the book which would have made a good talking point. I saw it on first release and had no idea that the android was just that until the words and numbers started scrolling down the screen. I’m not sure if it was an original idea but for me the revelation was unexpected and shocking. It might not make it into a book on horror as the film could be considered sci-fi, but as King says about Alien the spaceship setting is incidental to the horror story and I suppose the same could be said of the time travel aspect of Terminator.   

  A few other films that spring to mind are, Pitch Black, bit of an Aliens rip-off but still good. Aliens itself, a rare breed, a sequel that’s as good as the original. 40 Days of Nights, best Vampire film I’ve seen in years. Gataca, spelling’s wrong for this one I’m sure but it stars Jude Law. An American Werewolf in London and The Others, the latter of which could be described as more ghost story than horror.

  There are many others but sadly too few, as horror movies seem to have lost their way in recent years. I’m no fan of the torture porn that seems to be popular at the moment. I’ve watched a few of them, the first Saw was one of the best, but avoid them now as they appear to be no more than mindless crap.

  The golden age of celluloid horror for me was my teenage years. I watched re-runs of The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, saw endless creatures crawl out off swamps and lagoons and revelled at the spectacular Star Wars. I also saw the Exorcist for the first and last time.         


Oh yeah - Terminator was fantastic for its time. I liked the sequels too. Alien was a classic, and again I liked the sequels. I agree that Gattica was one of the best horrors of recent times. Wasn't keen on any of the Saws, TBH. What did you think of Silent Hill and the Resident Evil films? Some great concepts there. The scene in SH where the MC had to find her way through all those demonic nurses sticks in my mind. Very creepy.

Star Wars was, if not the first, then one of the first films I ever went to see at the cinema. Fantastic, especially when you consider what they achieved when SFX was in its infancy.
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« Reply #946 on: April 26, 2009, 07:51:40 AM »

Terminator (and sequels) - great. Alien (and sequels) - great. Sixth Sense - great. Total Recall - great. Haven't seen Gattaca. Star Wars (and sequels) - over-hyped load of wimpish shite.

Funniest horror movies: 'Carry on Screaming', naturally; and Vincent Price's finest hour, the totally brilliant 'Theatre of Blood'. Bliss!
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« Reply #947 on: April 26, 2009, 01:22:38 PM »

What did you think of Silent Hill and the Resident Evil films? Some great concepts there.

  Silent Hill, now there’s a good film. I loved the apocalyptic atmosphere and freaky monsters. The whole thing has a nightmarish quality to it It’s great for something that was apparently based on a game, as are The Resident Evil films. The scene with Alice and the Dobermans in the original springs to mind, I wondered how she was going to get out of that one.

  A few other modern classics imo are Dawn of the Dead, the original and remake. Twenty Eight Days Later and its sequel. The Ring, the Hollywood version not the Japanese as it has a cheap and tacky feel to it, the story line is good but for me it was much better with the injection of some American money, and, not strictly a horror film but it still portrayed hell on earth, Letters From Iwo Jima.

  I recently saw Romero’s Diary of the Dead and a funny film it is. Not in the same league as Carry on Screaming but what is.

  Thinking about Vincent Price I must track down the film he made that was based on the book ‘I am Legend‘. I saw the Will Smith version, it’s good as is Charlton Heston’s take on the character but both films took liberties with Richard Matheson’s story. It will be nice to see if Mister Price fares better.             
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delph_ambi
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« Reply #948 on: April 26, 2009, 02:20:55 PM »

I don't know the film, but Mr Price is usually shivery good the moment he opens his mouth.
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Ed
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« Reply #949 on: April 26, 2009, 02:56:07 PM »

Yep - The Ring was spooky as hell, as was The Grudge. I never saw the Japanese version of either one of them, but the American remakes were hellish good in both cases. I love films that give me a shiver like those ones. Excellent afro

Letters From Iwo Jima was a good film - captured the madness of war very well. I saw another great war film recently, set during the first world war, but I can't remember the name of it for the life of me. It was set in the trenches and at some point featued a German airship blowing up.
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« Reply #950 on: April 26, 2009, 06:31:31 PM »

Saw "Don't Look Now" again recently, and it was even better than I remembered. I also really like "Cube" (haven't seen either of the  sequels, mind). The first "Halloween" was great, too. Quite recently they repeated one of those excuse-for-Jimmy-Carr-to-earn-a-few-bob things on Channel 4 which was something like the 100 greatest scary moments ever, and some of the creepiest ones were public information films.

Also ... it's not a horror film per se, but has anyone else seen "Hard Boiled"? Early John Woo film, and quite possibly the daftest film of all time. Certainly has one of the highest body counts I've seen. £2 from Sainsburys and worth every penny.
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« Reply #951 on: April 26, 2009, 08:54:11 PM »

Caz,

That film with Vincent Price would be 'The Last Man on Earth'. The Charlton Heston version is 'The Omega Man'.

Also, thought the name of the author escapes me, the guy who wrote 'I am Legend' also wrote 'The Incredible Shrinking Man' - two classic books from the paranoid era of American history when there were Reds under the beds.

DW Cheesy
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« Reply #952 on: April 27, 2009, 02:48:35 AM »

Richard Matheson wrote the original 'I am Legend' published in 1954. Matheson helped write the screen play for the story's first film adaptation, The Last Man on Earth, but was dissatisfied with the Italian film location.

Geoff
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Ed
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« Reply #953 on: April 27, 2009, 05:26:01 AM »

I didn't think much of the Will Smith version of I Am Legend - it fell a bit flat on several levels I thought.
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« Reply #954 on: April 27, 2009, 05:46:42 AM »

Haven't kept up with the horror movie world in many a long year - though the kids insisted I watch Saw recently. And Saw 2. From what I can gather the ability and availability to create much more realistic gore and diabolical machines of torture has taken over from the slow scary suspense of the fillums of my youth (Halloween, for example).  Is Cronenberg still making horror movies? I recall throughly enjoying some of his early low budget works.

Derek
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« Reply #955 on: April 27, 2009, 02:13:52 PM »

  DW,

  The Incredible Shrinking Man, what a great film. I’ll never forget the battle with the spider. The terror and suspense of it all. Many modern film makers seem to have forgot how to scare an audience in that way and have settled for grossing them out instead. The book is one of the ones King recommends reading, there’s a whole list of them at the end of Danse Macabre.

  Maybe the powers that be should go through the list and give us some proper scary films, ones that don’t involve severed limbs and buckets of blood. It’s the kind of thing I’ve seen too often for it to have any real impact, though I'm sure I'll still watch some of them. I guess all a story really needs are some dark corners and the knowledge that something is waiting there to make it a spine tinglier.
         
  Not sure if Cronenberg is still making movies. I saw one of his films, can't remember what it was called but it was rather weird.
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« Reply #956 on: April 27, 2009, 02:43:05 PM »

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The book is one of the ones King recommends reading

I remember collecting and reading all of the books that King analysed in the Horror Fiction chapter of the book - Ghost Story, Julia, The Haunting Of Hill House, The House Next Door, Rosemary's Baby, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers, The Doll That Ate Its Mother, Something Wicked This Ways Comes, The Incredible Shrinking Man etc etc. Great books every one of them. I recall he also did a large section on Harlan Ellison and I wa sreally annoyed because I could never get anything by Ellison in those pre-internet days. Times have changed and I now have a great breezeblock of a book called The Essential Ellison. I must read some more of the stories in there... and I must reread King's chapter on him.

I must reread Danse Macabre, too!

Derek
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« Reply #957 on: April 27, 2009, 03:31:57 PM »

Speaking of Matheson, another good movie based on one of his novels is A Stir of Echoes starring Kevin Bacon. Not terribly scary, but really good.
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Ed
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« Reply #958 on: April 29, 2009, 02:30:47 AM »

I see the conspiracy buffs have sunk their teeth into the potential swine flu pandemic. Predictably, they're saying it's an engineered virus that is being field tested. They point to the fact it's unusual for a flu virus to start out of season, and not come from the East. Like all good conspiracy theories it's got a second string - suggesting the virus may be part of a global plan to reduce the population, and that the mysterious deaths of microbiologists in recent years could be connected to this outbreak-- scientists who could help stop a pandemic were taken out. Another source posited flu fears could be deliberate hype by governments in order to distract the public from the recession. afro

I love conspiracies

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« Reply #959 on: April 30, 2009, 01:56:50 AM »

I normally roll my eyes when I hear people speculating about "the government" experimenting on the population for one nefarious purpose or another. But I admit even I wondered when I heard the newscaster say on the first night the news hit the airwaves that this mysterious new flu had "swine, avian, and human genes." My first thought was, "that sure sounds engineered to me."

But as with most things, it's ignorance at the root of our fears. I just went to the all-knowing Google to see what I could find, and lo and behold, here's this tidbit from a timeline of the progression of the swine flu pandemic:

Quote
1998:

An H1N1 swine flu virus containing swine, avian and human genes is recognized in pig populations
in North America. This virus will later be recognized as a parent of the new swine flu.

Holy cow! I had no idea its origin could be traced back 11 years. Then, in another article, there was this bit about mutation and immunity:

Quote
The influenza virus is constantly mutating. That's why we can't get full immunity to the flu, the way we can to diseases like chicken pox, because there are multiple strains of the flu virus and they change from year to year. However, even though the virus makes us sick, our immune systems can usually muster enough of a response so that the flu is rarely fatal for healthy people.

But every once in awhile, the virus shifts its genetic structure so much that our immune systems offer no protection whatsoever. This usually happens when a flu virus found in animals--like the avian flu still circulating in Asia--swaps genes with other viruses in a process called reassortment, and jumps to human beings.

While I think it's possible for scientists to engineer a flu virus, I don't think it's possible for them to control what happens to it once it's out in the wild. Given the rapid mutation and unpredictability of responses, I find it hard to believe that a secret program could be conducted AND remain secret AND attain any goals reliably. it's not like they could do testing on animals first: the response would be totally different. It just doesn't make sense in this scenario, even if you're willing to believe the government would do it if they could.
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