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Author Topic: The good morning, good night thread  (Read 589773 times)
LashSlash
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« Reply #2925 on: March 14, 2011, 04:59:07 AM »

.... I just hope I can figure out a way to leave room for a well-paced ending within the 2500 word count limit.....


reaching out with a helping hand i give you:-


the dankawanka template & rule of thumb for writing shorter short-stories:-

 
template for story:


begining: write a long-toothed, catchy begining
  
middle: [implement the 'to cut a long story short' technique]. suggested text: So, I'll cut a long story short.
 
end: write a short evocative ending. suggested text: The poor beast's remains were buried under the driveway, in the shade of a spreading marula tree.
 
 
 
...dont forget to write 'the end' at the end and feel free to copy and paste all suggestions.

*********************************************************************************************

Near&Pharr, good lucky-luck with  that whittikles marathon thing. afro afro afro




« Last Edit: March 14, 2011, 05:07:54 AM by LashSlash » Logged
Ed
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« Reply #2926 on: March 18, 2011, 03:47:21 AM »

Somebody help me understand why we are interfering in Libya's civil war, please scratch I don't see how it's any of our business. Is it really just because the country has oil reserves? And if it isn't, then why don't we intervene in every civil war in every country around the world?

What are we going to send to impose a no fly zone, anyway? I get the impression we've scrapped or mothballed most of our naval air power. All the harriers have been taken out of service, as has the Ark Royal aircraft carrier -- I don't think that leaves much. Wars are expensive, too. Where are we going to get the money to pay for it all? I just don't get it scratch
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« Reply #2927 on: March 18, 2011, 04:39:43 AM »

It's all about the oil...

I agree with you, Ed. I don't understand why we're reacting the way we are to this one whilst having left other similar situations well alone for years. Unless, of course, it really is all about the oil (or unless one of the true big players has said 'jump').

I often wonder if it's the same within other 'minor' countries - that their news bulletins have their leaders expounding how 'they' won't allow dictators elsewhere to do this or that, or if it's just Great Britain (maybe on account of we once had an empire). It would seem natural that wherever you are in the world you feel your country is important in global terms, but sometimes I suspect we are the only ones whose leaders actually believe the fallacy.

Derek
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« Reply #2928 on: March 18, 2011, 06:05:16 AM »

This discussion on whether a country should interfere in another if they feel a moral prerogative to do so goes back to Sparta having the same debate. Then the elders worried about small islands being overwhelmed by bigger countries and responding to help calls. However, it seems different now. I know people are being hurt, they always do in civil war situtations such as we have in Libya. It seems hypocritical though for the UK and US to add their military muscle to prevent a government putting down a revolt on its own territory - no matter what we think of Gaddafi. It could badly backfire. Such interference rarely works. He could then revoke his better behaviour of recent years - he renounced WMD, and allegedly not supported terrorism, and declared opposition to Al Qaida. All that could change. Then if the UK implement a no fly zone because Libya's government is using planes or artillery to put down a revolt, why don't we do that in Chechnya? It couldn't be that Libya has 2% of the world's oil production, could it? And has a tiny airforce - easy meat. Or that David Cameron is playing the Maggie Thatcher card: aiming for war as a distraction from domestic problems.
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LashSlash
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« Reply #2929 on: March 18, 2011, 06:30:02 AM »

......yes, and what happens if you interfere and gadaffi wins the war and your country becomes part of the lybian empire......?  think about that!

it didnt take long for a coupla of lybian fedayeen to round up some top-elite SAS tough guys; kaffiyahs  flying over the cliffs of dover?  scratch
« Last Edit: March 18, 2011, 06:30:43 AM by LashSlash » Logged
delboy
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« Reply #2930 on: March 18, 2011, 07:56:19 AM »

In other news - possibly more than a little relevant to the above discussion - my copy of Doomology arrived today. Excellent looking book - and very substantial, too. Good work by the Rev!

Derek
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« Reply #2931 on: March 19, 2011, 03:04:19 PM »

Thanks Del!  Now if only I had time to read my own copy haha  Wink

I'm in that bloody annoying part of living somewhere new where loads of stuff is still in boxes but there's nothing to put it in/on, so it has to stay in boxes and look like a tip.  And I've got nothing to do tonight so want to do SOMETHING! I'm tempted to have a crack at putting curtain poles up but if it goes wrong my housemate is not the sort of woman you want to get angry hahahah

I have just been looking at portfolios for artists for the cover to the Glitch antho I'm working on.  Some really, really good stuff, that I have a terrible feeling will be beyond the budget of the Library (since doing No More Heroes I've being coming up with a 'cheap' and 'expensive' cover idea for anthos).  Fingers crossed one of the really nice artists is up for doing it...

Also, found out this week that I'm getting my hours cut at work AND there's a chance the gallery'll be 'employing' volunteers...I've only recently found out quite what the 'Big Society' is all about, and quite frankly it sucks balls. But that's a spiel for another time, I think  Wink
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« Reply #2932 on: March 20, 2011, 05:32:17 AM »

This discussion on whether a country should interfere in another if they feel a moral prerogative to do so goes back to Sparta having the same debate. Then the elders worried about small islands being overwhelmed by bigger countries and responding to help calls. However, it seems different now. I know people are being hurt, they always do in civil war situtations such as we have in Libya. It seems hypocritical though for the UK and US to add their military muscle to prevent a government putting down a revolt on its own territory - no matter what we think of Gaddafi. It could badly backfire. Such interference rarely works. He could then revoke his better behaviour of recent years - he renounced WMD, and allegedly not supported terrorism, and declared opposition to Al Qaida. All that could change. Then if the UK implement a no fly zone because Libya's government is using planes or artillery to put down a revolt, why don't we do that in Chechnya? It couldn't be that Libya has 2% of the world's oil production, could it? And has a tiny airforce - easy meat. Or that David Cameron is playing the Maggie Thatcher card: aiming for war as a distraction from domestic problems.

Could be.

I just hope the troubles don't flare up again in Northern Ireland -- we might end up getting invaded by Luxembourg or Guatemala, for humanitarian reasons, or something. scratch
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« Reply #2933 on: March 20, 2011, 07:32:40 AM »

I was in Khartoum with my (Southern) Sudanese wife and my kids when John Garang, the southern leader, died in an unfortunate helicopter crash, shortly after the peace accord between north and south Sudan was signed.

Rioting started in central Khartoum by Southerners who felt Garang had been assassinated, and I and one of my wife's cousins ran the gauntlet of an exultant mob of northerners to get back to my family.

That evening, the prayer call started up in several mosques (including one a hundred yards from where we were staying) late at night. The congregations were urged to go out and kill any southerners they knew of or found on the streets. What followed was one of the scariest nights of my life, holed up in a darkened house while roaming bands of vigilantes wandered about armed with machetes and knives. A party of such would-be killers passed the perimeter wall of our house at around midnight.

Fortunately the army was called onto the streets to reimpose order, so things didn't deteriorate to Ruwanda conditions. There were casualties however.

If the situation had got to the stage of wholesale slaughter, I would like to imagine that rather than discuss pennies and pounds and petty politics, the West would have taken action. Surely helpless people deserve the protection of stronger nations - then again, maybe they don't.

Just an observation from on the ground.

DW Cheesy
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« Reply #2934 on: March 20, 2011, 07:55:58 AM »

Sounds horrific, Womble. Is it the same, though? I haven't heard of any such outrage in Libya. If I had then I would wholly agree with the West intervening, just as they did in the former Yugoslavia. That's fine and right, but in this instance I've heard nothing about Libya for years. Not since all the furore about the Lockerbie bombing, and the crisis at the Libyan embassy in London, all those years ago.
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« Reply #2935 on: March 20, 2011, 01:54:26 PM »

Perhaps it comes down to whether our priorities are fiscal or humanitarian considerations.

In Libiya we have a repressed people taking courage from the current trend of questioning their entrenched tyrant's right to rule them - and facing the consequences. If the West is happy with retaining the status quo and turning a blind eye to keep the price of oil down, well good luck to them.

Meanwhile, I'm working with folk whose kin are being sytematically killed off. Perhaps if you have to look these people in the eye every day rather than bemoan a penny added on the price of petrol, it does make a difference.

And the reason you haven't heard anything about Libya for years possibly depends on what you read.

DW Cheesy

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« Reply #2936 on: March 20, 2011, 03:03:32 PM »

Listening to the rhetoric from the freedom fighters / terrorists / rebels in Benghazi on what they'd like to do with Gadaffi and those loyal to him, we are in for a bloodbath whoever wins. Gory rather than glory for Cameron's war. But at least it's nice to know that the closure of a few council youth centres and Sure Start activities, will help pay for half of one of the Tomahawk missiles. 
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« Reply #2937 on: March 20, 2011, 04:22:19 PM »

I dunno, Womble. Maybe it looks different to you because of where you live and what you read, but it seems to me every time the west intervenes in the Arab countries they make matters worse instead of better. And I'm sad to say, I reckon the govt's true reason for intervention has less to do with a humanitarian mission and more to do with the control of oil. Same as in Iraq.

And of course we will 'bemoan' the price of fuel -- it adversely affects every aspect of our already stricken economy. Our lives revolve around it. Even then, I don't think anybody would care about a penny here or there, but the price of a gallon of diesel is going up in leaps and bounds. It's already above six quid a gallon. It goes up every time anything happens -- the Japanese earthquake, the unrest in the middle east, in Libya, wherever, whatever, the price goes up. Our lives may be privileged in comparison to what you see, but it's all we know, and life is getting harder all the time for us. Britain's quite a depressing place to be at the moment.
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« Reply #2938 on: March 20, 2011, 04:23:46 PM »

Sounds horrible DW. I loathe war. But, thats the hippy in me speaking. I think things like this should be settled by the head asshats in a ring of death.
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« Reply #2939 on: March 20, 2011, 09:36:53 PM »

I loathe war myself (even though I'm adamant about not having a hippy bone in my body).  But I'm also terrified of a world that would not stand by their commitments as well.  I see no simple answer in any of the events happening (especially in the Arab world).  There are too many concerns, too many needs, and too many ideologies for a simple single answer to all of the issues...wish it were different, but there it is...

As always my thoughts and concerns go out to all...
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