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Author Topic: What is "sir"?  (Read 22856 times)

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Offline Woody

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What is "sir"?
« on: August 01, 2009, 02:40:32 PM »
Is "sir" only a proper noun or does it have other ways it can be used.

For example
"Excuse me a minute, sir." Should "sir" be capitalised or is it just a formal way to reference someone.

As opposed to "Please let me introduce Sir John Cleggs-Bennett."
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delph_ambi

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Re: What is "sir"?
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2009, 04:19:19 AM »
Sir is only capitalised if used with a name as a general rule. It might still be capitalised without the name, if the name is implied. Otherwise, it's lower case. I suppose the rule is to capitalise it if using it as a proper noun, but to use lower case if you're using it as a pronoun.

Offline Woody

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Re: What is "sir"?
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2009, 03:48:50 PM »
cheers for clearing that up Delph.
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Offline Ed

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Re: What is "sir"?
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2009, 05:12:15 PM »
Meant to reply to this the other day, but decided to wait until I was at home. Then forgot, sorry.

I was going to say I'd treat it the same as a word like 'dad'. If a character is directly addressing the person, and saying for instance, "Pass it here, Dad." Then it's capitalised. But if they're simply referring to the person, such as, "I'm going to visit my dad later." Then it's not capitalised. Oddly, if he was to say, "I'm going to visit Dad later." Then it would also be capitalised, BTW.

I could be wrong, but that's my take on it. I don't think any markets would penalise you for getting it wrong, though.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2009, 05:13:45 PM by Ed »
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delph_ambi

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Re: What is "sir"?
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2009, 01:33:37 AM »
Nothing odd about it, Ed. In your 'dad' examples, you're simply capitalising where you're using it as a proper noun (try substituting 'Joe' for 'Dad' and then 'dad' and you'll see why it works).

 

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