gfxgfx
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
gfx gfx
gfxgfx
 
Got a few minutes to kill? Try the Doom Flash Challenge afro - http://www.cafedoom.com/forum/index.php/board,36.0.html
 
gfx gfx
gfx
55884 Posts in 6181 Topics by 556 Members - Latest Member: wallynicholson666 January 22, 2020, 01:53:10 AM
*
gfx* HomeForumHelpLoginRegistergfx
gfxgfx
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.       « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: So who were all these awful horror writers then?  (Read 4974 times)
delboy
Global Moderator
*****

Karma: +1/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 2242



WWW
« on: October 21, 2009, 04:38:27 AM »

A couple of times recently I've read interviews and articles in which the alleged poor perception of horror fiction in the eyes of the business (and possibly the public) is down to the slew of awful horror books that flooded the market in the 80's. Something we've never recovered from, allegedly.

Gary Braunbeck writes:

"Face it; the majority of horror published in during the standards-free tsunami of the 1980's was worthless...It seemed any idiot with access to a typewriter...who'd also read every Stephen King book and seen every Nightmare on Elm Street movie decided that all you needed to do was take a graphic description of a days work at the local slaughterhouse...throw in a couple of sex scenes...."

His section on this issue goes on for much longer but you get the idea.

Stephen Jones, in the interview that Ed linked to, said:

"It’s no secret, in fact it’s pretty much rote by now, that horror’s reputation has never recovered in the ongoing aftermath of the 1980s/1990s boom and bust. "

and the interviewer alludes back to somethiung else Jones had written when:

"You (Jones) placed most of the responsibility for the genre’s downturn on the publishers themselves, who, as you saw it, had flooded the market with inferior material in a shameless attempt to cash in on the horror boom."

Personally, I was reading King, Ramsey Campbell, a little Koontz, some Dan Simmons, Robert McCammon, Peter Straub, John Farris, TED Klein, Whitley Streiber, and suchlike in the eighties. I don't think any of them could be included as being standards free, or responsible for any such freefall in public opinion. I also recall reading James Herbert, Gary Brandner (?), and John Saul, none of whom really floated my boat, but again if my memory is right, these were good guys too. For me that leaves Guy Smith and the other fellow who used to hang around with Iron Maiden and who's name I've forgotten. Their work (from memory) had more of a tendancy to go fo rthe lowest common denominator, but those guys, were seventies writers, I believe, not authors who cashed in on the boom. They were already there doing their thing, and still are. So who are the guilty parties??

Discuss.

Derek
Logged

"If you want to write, write it. That's the first rule. And send it in, and send it in to someone who can publish it or get it published. Don't send it to me. Don't show it to your spouse, or your significant other, or your parents, or somebody. They're not going to publish it."
 
Robert B. Parker
Rev. Austin
loves you like his own sister.
Critter
***

Karma: +2/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 1459


AAAAIIIIIIIEEEEEEEEEEEE


WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2009, 06:00:47 AM »

Night of the Crabs by Guy Smith is one of my favourite books  grin I used to read loads of stuff like that; nature running amok, mutant animals, etc.  Says a lot for my mindset  Wink Maybe it's those sorts of books?  Although like you say Del, I think most of those were written during the 70's, so maybe not grin
Logged

facebook.com/waynegoodchildishaunted
Stay in touch! I don't mean that in a pervy way.
Cory Cramer
Critter
***

Karma: +0/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 54


« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2009, 09:58:23 AM »

In my opinion, any bust should first be attributed to natural cyclical economic forces. If we are going to move beyond that, then blame falls squarely on the shoulders of the best-sellers of the time because those were the writers people read the most. I stopped reading horror around that time because 1) my life was changing and I stopped reading fiction period, and 2) because the best-sellers (I'll let you fill in the names) were not compelling enough for me to read them.

I've seen this same misguided notion applied to self-publishers today. And, it is wrong for precisely the same reasons. Small-press horror from 2001-2007 (give or take) was successful primarily because of a glut of talent that simmered under radar during the post early1990's bust period (part of natural cyclical economic forces). As that glut was expelled, I saw many an author blame self-publishers for flooding the market with crap, and blaming them because the small-press was floundering. Again, nobody was reading self-published books, they were, however, beginning to read sub-standard, small-press books because most of the really good stuff that had been pent up in the late 1990s had made its way to the market.

Logged
Dragoro
Grave Digger
**

Karma: +0/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 95


WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2009, 12:31:20 PM »

Just my oppinion but Saul's books seemed to be formalic and mundane. But thats just me, and his success compared to my own hardly puts me in a position to criticize lol.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2009, 01:24:10 PM by Dragoro » Logged

NEGOTIUM PERAMBULANS IN TENEBRIS.
Ed
The Mastah, muahahaaaa....
Administrator
***

Karma: +6/-1
Offline Offline

Posts: 11081


Don't look behind you!!!!!


« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2009, 10:28:58 AM »

I'm not a fan of James Herbert, and I'm sure the things I've said about Crickley Hall will come back and bite me in the ass some day (maybe even get bitten by the author himself while attending a convention sometime), but I'd be tempted to add his name at the top of the list.
Logged

Planning is an unnatural process - it is much more fun to do something.  The nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise, rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression. [Sir John Harvey-Jones]
gfx
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
gfx
Jump to:  
gfx
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Page created in 0.082 seconds with 29 queries.
Helios /
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!